skip to main content

Securities Fraud Blog

Greco & Greco, P.C.

W. Scott Greco

Fight Investment Fraud

Greco & Greco's lawyers represent investors to recover losses caused by securities fraud, churning, lack of suitability, negligence, sales of unregistered securities, unauthorized trading, and other misconduct by stock brokers, investment advisors, financial planners and their firms.

For a Free Attorney Consultation, call us at 877-821-5550 orĀ 

LPL Financial

Prudential Fined for Failure to Supervise Fraudulent Withdrawals From Variable Annuity

FINRA fined Prudential Annuities Distributors $950,000 this month for its failure to detect and prevent the theft by its agent, Travis Wetzel, of almost $1,300,000 from a customer's variable annuity.  The FINRA Letter of Acceptance, Waiver, and Consent may be found here.  

Mr. Wetzel, who was a former registered representative of LPL Financial, allegedly submitted multiple forged wire transfer requests from the variable annuity, to be paid to a third party account in Mr. Wetzel's wife's maiden name.

FINRA alleged that Prudential failed to investigate red flags and audits associated with the repeated payments to third parties.  FINRA stated "PAD failed to establish and maintain reasonable supervisory procedures and controls to supervise third-party distributions and prevent fraudulent withdrawals from VA accounts."  

Although the FINRA press release states that the victim was repaid her losses, brokerage firms do not always voluntarily do so in broker theft cases.  Greco & Greco has extensive experience in broker theft and forged withdrawal/wire cases.  Although the individual thief may not have the funds to return the stolen monies, the associated firms required to supervise the activities of their agents may be found responsible under multiple legal theories.  If you are the victim of a fraudulent theft, wire, or withdrawal, please contact Scott Greco for a free attorney consultation about your case.

Posted by W. Scott Greco on 07/22/16.
ArbitrationBrokerage FirmsPrudentialLPL FinancialFINRAFraudSecurities FraudUnauthorized TradingPermalink

Multiple Investor Awards in Recent FINRA Arbitrations of TIC Claims

A review of recent FINRA Arbitration Awards show that TIC investors have had multiple victories in sales practice claims against the FINRA brokerage firms that sold them Tenant in Common (TIC) investments.  Claims have included securities fraud, breach of fiduciary duty, negligence, failure to supervise, elder abuse, and misrepresentations and omissions.  The following FINRA awards may be found at the FINRA web site:

1.  Hardt, et al. v. LPL Financial LLC.  No. 11-00347.  The arbitration panel in this San Diego, California arbitration awarded $1,367,000.00 in compensatory damages, interest, and costs.  Claims against two other Broker-Dealers were dismissed by Claimants.  The claims related to investments with Direct Invest LLC which included investments in Heron Cove. LLC and Braintree Park, LLC.

2.  Lightfoot, et al. v. Pacific West Securities, et al.  No. 11-00230.  A Seattle, Washington panel submitted another multi-million dollar award:  $1,862,960,65 plus $200,000 in attorneys fees for violations of the Securities Act of Washington.  The panel found a violation of the standard of care by Respondents for “the disavowal by Respondents of any obligation to conduct a suitability analysis for the sale of TICs in the circumstances of a Section 1031 - like kind assets exchange for tax deferral purposes.”  Multiple TICs were involved: TSG Midwest, Evergreen Springs, Argus TriWest, Passco River Park and Passco Promenade.

3.  Griswold v. Burch & Company, Inc., et al.  No. 10-02477.  In this Alaska case, the panel awarded almost all of the compensatory damages requested ($350,000), plus interest for a claim related to Beamer Place Apartments.

4.  Tommerup, et al. v. Waveland Capital Partners LLC, et al.  No. 10-04616.  This Helena Montana arbitration involved two DBSI TIC investments (Executive Park LLC, and DBSI Arrowhead, LLC 1965, 1705 & 1715
Indian Woods Circle), and a request for $410,000 in damages.  The panel awarded $301,875.00 which included interest, and $27,000 of discovery sanctions.

5.  Wiborg, et al. v. Pacific West Securities, Inc.  No. 10-02818.  In another arbitration involving Pacific West (this one in San Francisco), the Panel awarded $300,000 plus $50,000 in punitive damages.  In awarding the punitive damages, the panel described the basis for its finding that Respondent “failed to supervise” the broker involved.  The Claimant alleged damages from two TICs -  DBSI Offices at Brookhollow Tenant-in-Common securities and Garlock & Company Museum Park Garage Tenant-in-Common securities.

Posted by W. Scott Greco on 03/16/12.
ArbitrationBrokerage FirmsBurch & CompanyLPL FinancialPacific West SecuritiesWaveland Capital PartnersFINRAPrivate PlacementsSecurities FraudSuitabilityTICPermalink

TIC CLAIMS ON THE RISE VERSUS BROKERAGE FIRMS

Tenant in Common (TIC) claims against the brokerage firms that sold them have recently resulted in multiple large FINRA arbitration awards, according to this this Investment News article

The use of Tenant-in-Common (TIC) real estate investments in conjunction with IRS 1031 exchanges greatly increased after the 2002 issuance of IRS Rev. Proc. 2002-22 which clarified issues related to the uses of TICs in like-kind exchanges.

TICs since that time have been typically sold as securities by securities salespersons registered with FINRA which is a self-regulatory organization overseeing the securities industry.  These salespersons (registered representatives) are required to be registered with a Broker-Dealer (brokerage firm) also regulated by FINRA.  The sale of TICs by Broker-Dealers and their representatives is very lucrative.  Selling commissions can be 7% or higher, and sponsors also would pay additional percentages to Broker-Dealers for “due diligence” expenses and marketing / selling expenses. 

The failure of securities salespersons and their firms to perform due diligence on the TIC deals they recommend, and on the sponsors of the TIC deals, can result in disastrous outcomes for their customers.  In addition, salespersons must engage in a suitability analysis prior to recommending TIC deals to their customers to ensure that these illiquid investments are suitable for the customer?s financial situation.  Federal and State Securities laws also prohibit the misrepresentation or omission of material facts in conjunction with the sale of a security.  Many state Acts provide for the recovery of losses, attorneys fees, and interest.

FINRA issued guidance to its members back in 2005 regarding the sale of TICs (NASD [now FINRA] Notice to Members 05-18).  The selling firm had duties with regard to obtaining a clear understanding of the customer?s investment goals and financial status for the purposes of making a suitability determination.  The firms’ representative also had to take into account the illiquid nature of the TIC interest, the risks from over-concentration, and the ?investment potential of the underlying real estate asset(s).?  In regard to overconcentration, FINRA warned:  “Concentration of an investor?s assets in a single asset class, however, is not suitable for many investors.”

The high sales fees of TICs, combined with the profits and expenses retained by the sponsors, could raise serious suitability concerns for salespersons recommending them as a tax deferral vehicle.  In fact, the Notice 05-18 above further warned: “As fees charged in connection with a TIC exchange increase, the money saved as a consequence of tax deferral will be offset. Accordingly, members should consider the effect of fees on each TIC exchange”

TICs are typically leveraged with a bank loan, and such leverage can unfortunately result in customers’ investments being wiped out should the bank foreclose on the property.  If you have lost monies in an illiquid or foreclosed upon TIC, and believe you may have a claim against the salesperson and firm, please contact one of the attorneys at Greco & Greco for a free consultation.  Greco & Greco regularly represents investors on a contingency basis.

Posted by W. Scott Greco on 02/21/12.
ArbitrationBrokerage FirmsInvest FinancialLPL FinancialFINRAPrivate PlacementsSecurities FraudSuitabilityTICPermalink

Most recent entries

Categories

Archives

RSS 2.0